Beaver Hills Country Club Hosts 2016 Winter Classic

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 31, 2016

Contact:

Daniel L. Smith
Director of Development
Quakerdale
(641) 497-5294
Development@Quakerdale.org

Beaver Hills Country Club to Host 2016 Quakerdale Winter Classic

(Cedar Falls, IA) – Quakerdale announced today that it will be holding its 2nd Annual Quakerdale Winter Classic ProAm at Beaver Hills Country Club in Cedar Falls, Iowa. This online fundraiser will run from December 5 to December 10 and feature 14 charities and 8 Quakerdale ministries.

Conceived in 2015, the event is designed to help expand awareness, increase online email subscriptions, and invite people to join their work as a volunteer, donor, or legacy supporter (leaving a legacy through a planned gift). The 2015 Quakerdale Winter Classic results for Quakerdale alone included an increase of 23 time in web traffic, more than 392,000 impressions on 71,000 plus Twitter accounts, nearly doubled their online subscriptions, and had 161 participants (100 from Iowa, 60 from the US, and one international).

In addition to Quakerdale’s eight ministries:

Family Centered Services

Beth Andrew, (641) 497-5294, BAndrew@Quakerdale.org

Hope4Healing

Ryan Keller, (641) 497-5292, RKeller@Quakerdale.org

Mobile Camp

Jason Kinney, (641) 497-5294, JKinney@Quakerdale.org

The Promise Academy

Larry Ketcham, (641) 497-5294, LKetcham@Quakerdale.org

Quakerdale

Rob Talbot, (641) 497-5294, RTalbot@Quakerdale.org

Quakerdale Eagles

Dustin Johnston, (641) 497-5294, DJohnston@Quakerdale.org

Quakerdale Retreat Center

Adam Koester, (641) 497-5294, AKoester@Quakerdale.org

Wolfe Ranch

Adam Koester, (641) 497-5294, AKoester@Quakerdale.org

 

… 14 charities have accepted their invitation to join Quakerdale ministries this year:

Apostolic Pentecostal Church Youth Group, Cedar Falls, IA (20)

Christina Cortez, (515) 494-3638, ccortez909@gmail.com

Iowa Heartland Habitat for Humanity, Waterloo, IA (23)

Andrew Finnegan, (319) 235-9946, afinnegan@heartlandhfh.org

Iowa Yearly Meeting of Friends (27)

Wes Blanchard, 515-961-0725, wes@weslynn.net

Love Never Sinks, Clarksville, IA (22)

Michelle Lucas, (319) 961-0398, mllucas72@icloud.com

Manning Child Care Center, Manning, IA (26)

Michelle Starman, (712) 655-5437, mccc@mmctsu.com

Multiplication Catalyst Ministries, Wichita, KS (18)

Randy Littlefield, (913) 683-3831, newchurches@efcmaym.org

NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Black Hawk County, Waterloo, IA (19)

Leslie Cohn, (319) 235-5263, namibh@qwestoffice.net

Neighbors Across the Land, Charles City, IA (05)

Marie Conklin, (641) 691-4146 or (641) 691-7204, natldrr@gmail.com

ReaLife Church, Waterloo, IA (15)

Michele Feltes, (319) 334-0155 or (319) 334-0263, Michele.feltes@gmail.com

Riverview Ministries, Cedar Falls, IA (14)

Marlene Wilson, (319) 268-0787, riverviewcc@gmail.com

Sacred Moment Ministries, Waterloo, IA (21)

Karen LaVelle, (319) 239-1432, karen159ln@gmail.com

South Sudan & Sudan Christian Community for Peace and Unity, Omaha, NE (16)

Aislinn Rookwood, (402) 515-7774 or (402) 715-8012, aisnielsen@yahoo.com

Tama County Young Guns 4-H Club, Gladbrook, IA (25)

Melissa Keller, (641) 750-2781 or (641) 750-6480, rmkeller2@netscape.net

THE LIFE Project, Cedar Falls, IA (17)

Matt Reisetter, (319) 230-2271, matt.reisetter@p2c.com

“This year is lining up to be something really special” said Dan Smith, tournament director. “We cannot thank Beaver Hills Country Club enough for stepping up and hosting this year’s event. I’m excited to see what God is going to do through this virtual golf tournament to position some awesome charities to do amazing work in 2017.” The event is open to the public. If you would like  to support one of these charities, you can contact them using the information provided below their listing.

To learn more about the 2016 Quakerdale Winter Classic ProAm, follow this link:

QuakerdaleWinterClassic.org

For information on how your charity can participate in the 2017 Quakerdale Winter Classic ProAm, contact:

Dan Smith
Tournament Director
(641) 497-5294
Development@Quakerdale.org

#######

#MakingADifferenceQ — #qwc2016proam

 

What I Did To Reduce The Craziness

My husband gave me this towel as a present the other day.

 

stress-cartoon

It is amazing how this one little saying can mean so much to a person, but it summarized one of the main struggles that I recently went through as a new mom of two. I have a 2 year old boy and a 4 month old little girl, I have a full-time job, and my husband and I run our family farm.  Let me tell you, making the adjustment from one kid to two kids can be pretty overwhelming (especially when your kids are only a year and a half apart).  One of the main struggles that I dealt with was that I felt like I couldn’t get anything done. Between helping run our family farm, my own full-time career, caring for an infant, keeping a toddler entertained, cooking for my family, cleaning our two-story farmhouse, laundry, bathing and bedtimes I felt like I could never keep up.   Having that feeling of never really accomplishing much was very frustrating for me, and I felt like this quote:

 

mom-quote

So one day a couple of months ago, I sat down, said a prayer and made a list of the things that could use some improvement in my life.

Here is the list of problems that I came up with:

  1. Morning Madness
  2. Messy House
  3. Piled-Up Laundry
  4. Suppertime Craziness
  5. The Toy Tornado

After looking at this list, I was pretty discouraged.  I realized that most aspects of my life were a mess.  I was wasting time being unorganized and scattered and worst of all… I was missing out on quality time with my husband and my kids.

I then realized that in order for me to be the best mom that I could be, I needed to get my act together.  So I did some research and I found that there are so many books and websites that are completely focused on helping new parents become more organized, and I felt a little better about myself knowing that there are tons of other people that felt the same way as me!

Fixes to the Morning Madness

One of my biggest pet peeves is when people show up late.  If I am less than 10 minutes early to work or an appointment, I feel like I am late.  All of that changed, however, when I had kids.  I felt like it did not matter what time I got up in the morning, something would happen right before we would all walk out of the door that would cause me to be 5 or 10 minutes behind.  I have to get myself up and ready, feed the infant, cook breakfast for the toddler, get both kids dressed, get a bag packed for the babysitter, get a lunch packed for my toddler, and also pack my own lunch.  And all of this needs to be done before 7:30 in the morning.  Mornings at my house got (and can still get) a little hectic, and I constantly felt like I was racing around while never really getting anywhere.  So I went to the internet.  I found an article from Parents Magazine on their website called No More Manic Mornings.

One of the tips from this article really helped my family with our morning madness: Start the Night Before.  That was their tip.  Now I know that this sounds pretty obvious, but I had never really considered how much I could get organized and put together at night.  I now pick out all of our clothes the night before.  I find the outfit that I am going to wear to work, and I also lay out what the kids are going to wear.  I also restock and pack the bag that the kids take to the babysitter’s house.  I make sure that the diapers and wipes are full and that each of my kids has at least one extra outfit, because you never know what they will get into or get on them during the day.  I even go as far as to pack the lunch bag that I send with the kids every morning.  I put everything in the lunch bag and keep it in the refrigerator overnight.  That way in the morning, all I have to do is grab a freezer pack and throw it in the lunch bag.  I do the same thing with my own lunch.  With all of these things prepared the night before, our mornings run so much smoother.  I am calmer, I get to spend more quality time with my kids as they eat their breakfast and we almost always get out of the door on time.  I would rather spend an hour on these things at night after my kids have gone to bed, than race around for an hour in the morning trying to get all of this done.  It starts all of us out on a good note, and makes our days more productive.

Fixes to Suppertime Craziness

One main issue that constantly posed challenges at my house was suppertime. As soon as I picked my kids up from the babysitters in the evening, my son wanted to eat supper.  I don’t know if any of you have had to experience the wrath of a toddler that is hungry… but let me tell you that it is not a pleasant experience.  My normal routine included getting home from work and try to figure out an idea of what to make for supper.  Then once I would get an idea of what to make, I would then have to figure out if I even had the correct ingredients.  I don’t know how many times I ended up pulling a frozen pizza out of the freezer to cook because I couldn’t find all of the ingredients to make a healthier meal.  By the time I was finally able to start supper, 20-30 minutes had already passed.  And remember, this whole process is going on while a toddler is screaming, “Hungry Mama… Hungry”.  I would then cook supper, and it would be after 7:00 when we finally all sat down to eat.  With us eating that late at night, the kids didn’t get baths until late, and they don’t make it to bed for their 8:00 bedtime.

One overwhelming response that I got from my research was the idea of Meal Planning.  This is something that takes a little extra time in the planning stages, but let me tell you it helps so much during the week, especially when I am standing in front of the fridge trying to figure out what to cook for supper at night.  Here is my process:

  1. Plan a meal for each night of the week, find the recipes and print them off.
  2. Go through the ingredient lists for your recipes and write down the ingredients that you are missing.
  3. Grocery shop on the weekend to prepare for the next week.

Every weekend, I sit down and figure out the meals that I am going to cook for the rest of the week.  I use Google and Pinterest and all I do is search for quick and health recipes that are kid friendly, and print off the ones that I want to use.  It is amazing how many people post recipes that are simple and that actually taste pretty good!  Here is an example of a recipe that I found on Pinterest for Family Style Roasted Chicken Bake and it came directly from Kraft Food’s website.

Once I have a menu planned out for the week and all of my recipes are printed out, I then go through the ingredient list.  I figure out the ingredients that I currently have (either in my pantry or in my fridge) and I figure out the ingredients that I need to purchase.  This makes making a grocery list SO MUCH EASIER!  I know the exact things that I need at the store to make the recipes for my weekly meal plan, and I spend less money because I am not buying random grocery items that are not needed.  I also plan my grocery shopping for the weekend, that way I do not have to make last minute trips during the week.  With all of that done on the weekend, when I get home from work I look at my meal plan menu and choose the recipe that I want to make.  This has simplified my life, and my toddler has been so much happier.  We now normally eat around 6:00 each night, which leaves me with plenty of time to spend with my family before we have to start bathing and putting kids to bed.

My next few blog posts will show the tips that I found and the plans that I have incorporated into my life that has really made a huge difference for my family.  We still have our crazy moments and life is still hectic at times, but a few changes have really helped to organize my time so that I can spend more with the ones that I love.jess-family

Jessica Winter, on behalf of the Quakerdale team.

Rest Easy

One of the big issues that impacted our recent restructuring at Quakerdale had to do with a lack of employees willing to do the jobs we needed done. I was reading about a survey done with workers hired to do the types of helping jobs Quakerdale hires and the results were interesting.

Tom Woll, a consultant to non profits like Quakerdale, recently interviewed three hundred workers in our field what it would take to stay at their position for two years. (Just two years!)  Tom stated that the answers revolved around five issues associated with the work: Stress, discouragement, belonging, purpose and fulfillment.

These were Millennial workers exclusively and all of them had concerns about the work that were very practical. They felt like the work they were doing was beyond their skills and that their training didn’t prepare them for the task. This led them to feeling discouraged and stressed out. These feelings of discouragement followed them home and had a negative impact on their personal lives. Many stated that if they do not feel calm in their work they will leave.

I know we all like to feel encouraged, stress free. We like to feel that we are fully prepared for the task and that those around us show appreciation and give us the feelings of purpose and fulfilment.

Where do feelings of stress, discouragement or belonging, purpose and fulfilment come from?

The last time I checked lasting feelings of contentment and well being  don’t come from others. The process of growing and “becomming” demands stress, anxiety, challenge and general discomfort.  Then we move to the next level and become the person we can ultimately become.  Then we better know our purpose, where we belong and what fulfils us.  Have you ever went and listened to a survivor story?  Someone who overcame something really terrible?  These people know who they are and it is because of the difficulty they experienced.

We as parents, friends or co-workers can model how to overcome hardship and take on challenges because we all have them.  We can find contentment in the midst of the trials and challenges of life even if our challenges are not bad enough to put us on the 6 pm news!   When we are modeling how to handle these challenges we must allow our kids  to experience increasing levels of hardship or challenge when they are young.  Kids who face difficulty or challenges experience stress and discouragement. Kids can learn that belonging, purpose and fulfilment come from going through difficult things instead of quitting.

So where are you helping yourself or your children avoid something difficult? Are you actually helping your child grow if you allow them to avoid the problem or fixing it for them?

Today try to take a look at life through the lense of growth and remember good things always require extra effort and they don’t come easy! Then we are better prepared for the next hard thing that always comes!

James chapter one is the place I go when things are hard in my life and I realize I am in a growth opportunity. You see as the old hymn says: “My hope rests in nothing less than Jesus’ blood and righteousness.” You see when our happiness is dependent on others or even the circumstances of this world we are surely going to be disappointed. Teaching our children, co-workers or our friends how to find happiness isn’t quitting or avoiding. It has to do with where we put our trust and happiness and how we go about our lives.

on-christ-the-solid-rock-i-stand

I want to share a great song with you with an introduction in a concert. Not only are we expected to extend ourselves as in James chapter one, but then we can also rest easy knowing God will carry our burdens!

#makingadifferenceQ

Hey, have you heard that corn causes cancer?

What would Iowa farmers do if the world believed corn causes cancer?  At first, farmers would protest, reminding people that corn is great for feeding cattle, pigs and poultry.  But if consumers stopped buying corn, would Iowa farmers keep growing corn?  NO!  Corn production would stop FAST!

The shocker statement about corn is a metaphor for what Quakerdale is going through today, one that could also be applied to churches as well.

Would cancerous corn mean farmers were no longer farmers?

Farmers would still be farmers, but I believe  farming  would change radically and almost instantly.  For a few years, it would be tough.  Farmers would go through some really hard times and some would quit. But farmers would still be farmers with the goal of feeding the world and our rich black Iowa farm land would still be here.  The idea of growing crops would still be the mission of farmers and another crop or two or three would replace corn, and eventually Iowa farmers would be busy again through adaptation and planning.

Today, “best practices” taught in universities and among social service professionals claim that out-of-home group homes and shelters are universally bad for families.  This movement started back in the 1990’s.  This summer, responding to diminishing placements and these  “best practices,” Quakerdale closed the last of our group homes and shelter programs.  We closed our Waterloo and Manning campuses because enrollment had dropped (again) 20% from the previous 12 months in our remaining shelter programs.  The state (our customer for those services ) rarely requires kids to be helped in out-of-home services anymore.

Since June people have asked, “Does Quakerdale help any kids anymore?”

Quakerdale has a mission, just like Iowa farmers, and a cultural change will not stop our efforts.  Quakerdale exists to teach children about God and teach them discipline and work skills, a mission begun by our founder Josiah White in 1851.

Thankfully, Quakerdale has many other ministry programs which help thousands of children and their families each year!  Even though we are renting and willing to sell the Manning and Waterloo facilities,  we continue to have a clear mission to teach people about God and life skills,  just as we have been doing for over 165 years.

Just like the farmer with a mission to grow crops, Quakerdale is still a ministry with a mission.  While the approach was primarily group homes and shelters in the 70’s – 80’s, other programs and ministries have been developed.  Last year, Quakerdale served 3464 children and their families (some were served in more than one program).  167 of those children were served in our group homes and shelters.   That means that in 2015, 3297 were touched to by Quakerdale through home and community based programs!

Yes, folks, Quakerdale is still #makingadifference for kids and their families in Iowa and the midwest.  Our methods might be forced to change, and the means may change, but our mission remains the same!  That mission is what makes Quakerdale so special…

Please come to our web site www.quakerdale.org to learn of all the different things going on at Quakerdale.   Or, if you are a facebook friend, like us there to see regular updates on what is happening at Quakerdale.   We are excited to see what God has for us in the future as we make room for his guidance and change at Quakerdale.

And PLEASE NOTE that Quakerdale ministries are made possible by the donations of volunteers and gifts of donations or assets of those from the past and present! Keep us in your annual or monthly charitable giving.  Remember us in your estate planning so you can leave a legacy with Quakerdale!

Rob Talbot, Quakerdale Executive Director
rtalbot@quakerdale.org
641-497-5294

PS. I mentioned the church in my opening “shocker” metaphor. Have any of you noticed church attendance changing?  I believe that the church, like Quakerdale, and like the farmer, has the same important mission it has always had, but how it does it needs to change, and as soon as churches figure out what the change needs to be we will see church participation rise.  Watch this interesting video spoken to college students about the revival of our selves and of the church into the future.  It takes pruning and faith to go to the next place God has for us!  We have to stop doing old things in order to start new things for Christ!

 

Please share you comments on this blog and give us feedback on the impact Quakerdale has had on you or someone you know!

#makingadifferenceq

Quakerdale Winter Classic Announces Host Site

We are proud to announce that the Beaver Hills Country Club in Cedar Falls, Iowa will be the host site for the 2016 Quakerdale Winter Classic ProAm. Last year at the Carroll Country Club we raised more than $16,000, increased our web traffic by a factor of 23x, grew our subscription lists, and spread the word about who we are and what we do to 71,000+ Twitter accounts with more than 392,000 impression!

This year we are inviting over 50 charities to join us. Collectively, our goal is to raise $1,000,000. Live play begins Monday, December 5 and concludes Tuesday, December 13. Our Results Celebration will broadcast live from Beaver Hills at 7:00 PM on December 15. We cannot wait to hear the stories of the impact this event will mean to so many awesome charities.

 

BeaverHillsIcon(150x150)QUESTIONS?:
Connect with us at: Quakerdale.org
Contact us at: (641) 497-5294 or Info@Quakerdale.org
#MakingADifferenceQ — #qwc2016proam

MINISTRY OPPORTUNITY: Become a Social Media Partner

Are you passionate about one or more of Quakerdale’s Ministries?

Do you use social media on a regular basis (specifically Facebook, Twitter, or Google+) to communicate with your family and friends?

Would you enjoy spending one hour a week using your social media account to spread the word about a Quakerdale Ministry?

Then we would like to invite you to …

SocialMediaPartner

Who Can Become a Partner …

  • I’m excited about Quakerdale!

    Anyone that is passionate about Quakerdale or one of its ministries

  • Has access to and uses Facebook, Twitter, and/or Google+
  • Sees social media as a great way to get important and entertaining information to the people they care about

 

What do they do …

  • Once a week they carve out at least one hour from their schedule to spread the word about Quakerdale or one of their ministries using their personal social media account by:
    • “You’ve got to see this. Now you know why I support Quakerdale!”

      Going to a Quakerdale ministry social media account,

    • Locating at least one post or tweet in the past 7 days they believe needs to be passed on to their friends and family, and
    • Then Like and Share/Retweet with a personal comment stating why you are choosing to pass on the information.
  • That’s all there is to it.

Will you help us tell your world about Quakerdale, its ministries, and the opportunities we have to serve and be served?

Then register right now to …

BECOME A SOCIAL MEDIA PARTNER

Quakerdale Announces 2015 Volunteer of the Year

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 7, 2016

Contact:

Daniel L. Smith
Director of Development
Quakerdale
(641) 497-5294
DLSmith@Quakerdale.org

(New Providence, IA) – On Thursday, June 30, Quakerdale held a Volunteer Reception in the Broer Commons at their New Providence campus. Volunteers from various Quakerdale ministries came together to celebrate the power of volunteering, to recognize the 2015 Q-Award Nominees, and to honor the 2015 Volunteer of the Year by presenting them the Q-Award.

Established in 1979, the Quakerdale Q-Award annually recognizes and honors individuals who have enhanced the organization’s mission through significant and/or unique volunteer contributions. Q-Award recipients are nominated by Quakerdale staff and selected by the Board of Trustees. Ministry directors are asked to consider special non-staff individuals who they believe made a significant contribution either directly or indirectly through raising funds, hands-on physical work, or in some other way partnering with them by sharing their time, talents, and/or treasures. All nominees are invited to and recognized at the Volunteer Reception held in June. The recipient of the Q-Award is announced at this event.

2015 Volunteer Nominees are…

Terry Beare, Promise Academy, New Providence Campus
Terry Beare and Mary Humrichouse
Terry Beare with Mary Humrichouse

“Terry is a tireless volunteer for home Eagle Basketball games keeping the score book. Terry has done this for at least four years and maybe longer. Many times Terry will keep the book for three back-to-back games…meaning almost six hours of nonstop action to keep track of. Terry also volunteers with the maintenance department every Tuesday and many weeks more often than that.”

Larry Ketcham, Promise Academy Administrator

Samantha Stephens, Wolfe Ranch, Marshalltown
R
Rochelle Stephens with Mary Humrichouse

“Sammie Stephens and her family have always helped with chores at Wolfe Ranch, usually just on Sundays. With the staff change and all that was happening in 2015, Sammie took on chores 6 days a week. She went above and beyond the call of duty by also helping with camps over the summer. The Stephens family is a vital and cherished part of the volunteer group at Wolfe Ranch.”

Samantha was unable to attend. Receiving on her behalf was Rochelle Stephens.

Riley Farland, Facility Manager, Wolfe Ranch

Patti Downs, Programs & Services, Waterloo Campus
Dave Holm with Patti Downs

“For the past couple years Quakerdale has partnered with Patti Downs to have a garden. Patti is the garden manager and works with a couple ladies from Food Corp. Laura McInerney and Grace Margherio are both Food Corps service members working mostly with the Waterloo public schools and community organizations to engage children in learning about nutrition, cooking, and gardening. These ladies come weekly to work with our clients in the garden and then at lunch time, show the clients different ways to prepare vegetables and then eat with them. This has been a real positive experience for the clients and they seem to enjoy eating something that they have helped grow.”

Leah Churchill, Leader of Operations, Waterloo

Ray Schumacher, Facilities, New Providence Campus
Ray Schumacher wiith Mary Humrichouse
Ray Schumacher with Mary Humrichouse

“Ray has dutifully worked each week on our maintenance volunteer day operating and maintaining the floor polisher. Ray is easy to work with and has even done research for the project on his own initiative. The polisher weighs several hundred pounds and grinds the cement to a polished finish through repeated trips across the surface. Ray has logged countless hours polishing floors in the Broer addition making a surface that will last for decades!”

Robert Talbot, Executive Director

Jean Gedlinske & Orchard Hill’s Route 55, Spiritual Life, Waterloo Campus
Dave Holm with Jean Gedlinske

“Jean and the Route 55 group from Orchard Hill serve at our Waterloo campus by teaching skills training to our youth. They have hosted a game night, a Mary Kay health & beauty demo, provided a Social time at Slife cottage, worked in flower beds with residents, provided an evening meal, worked in the Community Garden with Patti Downs most Thursday mornings, facilitated a Thanksgiving Meal cooking event, and even showed residents how to sew Christmas stockings. Jean also worked with UNI student volunteers to provide a Financial Literacy class.”

Jean was unable to attend. Receiving on her behalf was Dave Holm.

Dave Holm, Spiritual Life Director

Robert Barnes, Heartland Vineyard Church, Hope4Healing
Robert Barns with Mary Humrichouse
Robert Barns with Mary Humrichouse

Bob has been an absolute blessing for Hope4Healing. He would be embarrassed for us to say this, but he is the role model we mention to other church communities considering Hope4Healing. We would like a person like Bob in every community we serve.

He has a very genuine love for people, giving them what they need not just fulfilling a request. He allows them to do what they can for themselves, empowering them to take more control of their lives. At the same time he reacts with “grace” when bad decisions are made, offering forgiveness and perseverance rather than condemnation or giving up. His is a stance of hope, keeping focused on possibilities for positive change.

Bob expects similar attitudes from his team. He has conscientiously selected the members of his team, realizing such a ministry is not for everyone. When things don’t go well within the team, Bob is willing to make the difficult decisions. He is also a source of emotional support for his team, offering guidance when needed. At the same time he is not reluctant to brainstorm with others to find the best solutions to difficult situations. He seeks guidance and support from the Heartland Vineyard pastoral team when circumstances are such that their support is needed. He has a willingness to accept the decision of the church leadership even when the decision they make is not what he originally thought he wanted. He has the humility to share decision making. Bob has managed to lead his team even amidst his own deep personal losses and chronic health issues.

Ryan Keller, Hope4Healing Administrator

The 2015 Q-Award recipient is …

20160705_QAward
Adam Koester, Rob Talbot, Rochelle Stephens, and Mary Humrichouse

Samantha Stephens, Wolfe Ranch

Check out photos from the event in our Photo Gallery

#MakingADifferenceQ

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 21, 2016

Contact:

Daniel L. Smith
Director of Development
Quakerdale

(641) 497-5294

Development@Quakerdale.org

Quakerdale Ends Emergency Shelter, Child Welfare Emergency Services, and Supervised Apartment Living Contracts

(New Providence, Iowa) – On June 10, 2016 the board of Directors of Quakerdale conducted a three year strategic planning session.  The following information is a result of those strategic decisions made.

Quakerdale has a 165 year history of working with children and families in the state of Iowa and we plan to continue our work until the Lord returns.  In order to fulfill these goals we must make difficult decisions to ensure our longevity and more importantly to respond to our always changing culture.

Over the last 30 years the state of Iowa has been transparently reducing the number of children and state funding for out of home services.  Over the last 16 years Quakerdale has been growing our privately funded community ministries to fulfill our mission to “Encourage hope, faith and growth in communities and families.”   These ministry programs (which are privately funded) are designed to move us into the future independent of state funding.  Quakerdale ministries are impacting hundreds of children and families each year all across the state of Iowa without state funds!  Quakerdale is determined to respond to the needs of our communities for another 165 years!

Now for the hard news:

Quakerdale has decided to end our Emergency Shelter, Child Welfare Emergency Services, and Supervised Apartment Living contracts with the state due to the new contracting risks in 2017, high program costs, and other mounting challenges.

This means over 20 children and 30 employees will be impacted today.

This was a painful decision and we grieve for the children we will not serve and our dedicated employees who will no longer be serving with us.  Our employees

are a part of our Quakerdale family and closing these programs means each one and their families will suffer.  We regret this deeply and will do everything we can to help each one transition as soon as possible.  We hope each worker will continue to support children and families in Iowa.  These are top notch people with hearts of gold.

We hope that our open facilities in Manning and Waterloo will be used by another agency or company to fulfill their role in the community. Quakerdale is forming community grants that will fund causes for children and families in each community in thanks for the wonderful support each community has given us.  We desire to stay active in these communities into the future!

You may be wondering, “What will happen to the other things we do apart from Emergency Shelter, Child Welfare Emergency Services, and Supervised Apartment living programs?”

Many people do not realize that each of our privately funded ministries, by themselves, are as large as other non profits and impact literally hundreds of people each year!

Here are some examples: Community counseling across Iowa, Wolfe Ranch retreat and Equine services in Marshalltown, Promise Academy for Kids and Post-Graduate Basketball in New Providence, and Hope4Healing and Mobile Camp are state wide ministries.  We will continue each one of these ministries! As always, we will continually evaluate each one and other new opportunities based on community needs, their effectiveness, and the resources we have through donor support.

We want to restate:  We grieve for those children we will not serve and our dedicated employees who will be impacted because we are ending these three programs.  We implore our supporters to keep each of these in their prayers.

#MakingADifferenceQ

How can I get involved?

Join the conversation on Facebook - Vector (Thumb)
Become a Volunteer (Thumb) Volunteer
Subscribe to our newsletter Newsletter (Thumb)
Make a donation to Quakerdale Donate_Button (Thumb)
Join the Financial Partner Team JoinToday (Thumb)

The Importance of Being Genuine

by Ryan Keller, Administrator, Hope4Healing

The goal of Hope4Healing is to help individuals “build a better life”.  The reality is that making changes toward a better life do not come in a vacuum.  Hope4Healing has seen many blessings since its launch in August of 2014, and to date has worked on close to 450 requests for more than 200 individuals all across Iowa looking to “…have life, and have it to the full.” (John 10:10 NIV).

I get the joy of speaking to many different groups across the state of Iowa, sharing with them the opportunities that Hope4Healing brings; allowing all of us to work together utilizing our individual talents or gifts.  Often times after I speak, someone will come up to me and want to discuss some of the finer points of how Hope4Healing might work; and usually when I am speaking to a church about their role as a Friendship Ministry toward those individuals needing help, I get a version of this type of question.  “What type of training do you offer to help us (the individuals in the church) to work with people who are looking for help through Hope4Healing?”  I was just asked this question last Sunday after a presentation.  Normally, I would diverge into a discussion about facilitating training in areas of knowing our role within the network, how to set boundaries, etc…; but I remembered something that changed my perspective when talking to the man who presented the question this past week.  We need to be genuine!  We might feel the need to be trained, and training is certainly a good thing; but there is such a thing as being overly trained to the point that our interactions become stale and insincere.

Let me share a shortened version of a story given by Dr. Chuck Swindoll that helps to make this point. (Pillow, 2001) 1

Teddy was disinterested in school. Musty, wrinkled clothes, hair never combed, he spoke in monosyllables. Unattractive, unmotivated and distant, he was just plain hard to like.

Even though Miss Thompson said she loved all her class the same, she wasn’t being completely truthful. She always marked the errors on Teddy’s paper with flair. She should have known better. She had Teddy’s records.

1st grade: Teddy shows promise, but poor home situation.

2nd grade: Teddy could improve. Mother seriously ill.

3rd grade: Teddy is good boy, but slow learner. Mother died.

4th grade: Teddy is very slow. Father shows no interest.

Christmas came and the boys and girls in Miss Thompson’s class brought her presents. Among the presents was one from Teddy Stallard. Teddy’s gift was wrapped in brown paper with a simple message on it, “For Miss Thompson from Teddy.”

When she opened Teddy’s present, out fell a gaudy rhinestone bracelet, with half the stones missing and a bottle of cheap perfume. Miss Thompson put the bracelet on and dabbed perfume on her wrist with feigned delight.

At the end of the day, when the other kids had left, Teddy lingered behind. He slowly came over to her desk and said softly, “Miss Thompson, you smell just like my Mother, and her bracelet looks real pretty on you. I’m glad you liked my presents.”

When Teddy left, Miss Thompson got down on her knees and asked God to forgive her. The next day when the children came to school, a new teacher welcomed them. She was no longer just a teacher; she was an agent of God. She was now committed to loving her children and doing things for them that would live on after her.

She helped all the children, but especially the slow ones, and especially Teddy Stallard. By the end of the school year, Teddy showed dramatic improvement. She didn’t hear from Teddy for a long time. Then one day she received a note that read:

Dear Miss Thompson: I wanted you to be the first to know. I will be graduating second in my class. Love, Teddy Stallard.

Four years later, another note came: Dear Miss Thompson: They just told me I will be graduating first in my class. I wanted you to be the first to know. The university has not been easy, but I liked it. Love, Teddy Stallard.

And four years later: Dear Miss Thompson: As of today, I am Theodore Stallard, M.D. How about that? I wanted you to be the first to know. I am getting married next month. I want you to come and sit where Mother would sit if she were here. You are the only family I have now. Dad died last year. Love, Teddy Stallard.

She went to the wedding. She sat where Teddy’s Mother would have sat. She deserved it.

Look around. Give yourself to a Teddy Stallard. Help somebody get a Fresh Start Now.

Miss Thompson was genuine throughout the whole story.  She had the training of a teacher to help her deal with what would be called today a problem child.  Many times today, we would see a school counselor, the department of human services, or foster care get involved in the life of Teddy; and those things are all benefits.  However, what Teddy WhatTeddyneeded most was the genuine concern and care expressed by another.  When Miss Thompson took a step back and realized that she had the opportunity to be a genuine friend in the lives of her students, she was (through God’s help) able to make a difference in the life of her students.  In the life of Teddy, she helped him “…build a better life…”

It is easy for all of us to want to hesitate to act out of a fear that we are not prepared for the task we are about to undertake.  Many times what is needed is our genuineness to befriend someone else; it is no different when intentionally befriending someone through your church’s Friendship Ministry team.  Were you trained to be a friend to your current friends?  We need to practice discernment as people of God, but don’t let fear keep you from genuinely touching the life of another.


1 Pillow, L. (2001, 12 21). Fresh Start: Give yourself to a ‘Teddy’. Retrieved 02 26, 2016, from The Cabin.net: http://thecabin.net/stories/122101/rel_1221010019.shtml#.VtBinPkrLIW.

To learn more about Hope4Healing, visit our website at: Hope4HealingQuakerdale.net